In another hilarious effort to combat Chinese regulations by game developers who wishes to break into the Chinese market, China publisher for PUBG Tencent has re-released the game (with some tweaks) on mobile as another title “Game for Peace” (和平精英).

The title in question can be more accurately translated into Peace Heroes which I think is hilarious for a battle royale game based on eliminating other players for an arbitrary objective.

Below, you can see the gameplay of Game for Peace:

It seems that several tweaks have been made to the game to make it more regulatory agency friendly as compared to the international release of the game. Things like bullets now have a paintball on-hit effect and instead of dying once the player’s health reaches 0, they had their death animation be replaced by them kneeling down and waving to the other player with them fading away at the end; Anyone getting some Spiderman Déjà vu with this?  

Reportedly, the game still shares the same kind of account history as PUBG Mobile which means that they would be sharing most of the game’s database with this “new” game, despite the publisher claiming otherwise.

Game publishers have a long history of censoring their own games for the China release as evident from popular games like WoW and Dota, with them being the more prominent example.

While doing some amount of research for this article, it appears that the actual law written in their policies is too broad to define what is “harmful” for the gaming audience, resulting in many publishers erring on the safe side to remove excessive violence, blood and gore. This, of course, includes but is not limited the infamous censorship of skeletons in games.

Via Kotaku

Chia is the horse-author from the far flung year of 2153. While not grazing on grass pastures or reviewing old time-y games and technology from the early 21st century pretending to not know what comes next (as to not disturb the space-time continuum), he can be seen exchanging vast quantities of Earth currency for parts needed to fix his damaged space ship.

Chia is the horse-author from the far flung year of 2153. While not grazing on grass pastures or reviewing old time-y games and technology from the early 21st century pretending to not know what comes next (as to not disturb the space-time continuum), he can be seen exchanging vast quantities of Earth currency for parts needed to fix his damaged space ship.